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Defining Moments quizzes

Have you been studying? Try our quizzes on defining moments in Australian history.

Civics and Citizenship timeline

Explore Defining moments in Civics and Citizenship in Australian history.

Industry and Environment timeline

Discover our new timeline on defining moments that relate to Industry and Environment.

Suggest a moment

7th Nov 2019 10:54am

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27th Oct 2019 1:10pm

How about adding some moments in history from the past 10 years to the defining moments wall.

Surely AFLW, marriage equality , stopping people climbing Uluru.

NMA team

Thanks for your great suggestions Elle. Our Defining Moments Discovery Wall is only a selection of the moments that we have on our Defining Moments website. There you’ll find full feature moments on two of your suggestions — marriage equality and women’s AFL. We will soon be publishing a full feature moment on the handback of Uluru, as well as the closure of the climb. Some of these more recent defining moments will also be added to the Discovery Wall soon, as we know our visitors are interested in them. Thanks for being involved in our Defining Moments program.

26th Sep 2019 12:04

Early aboriginal history maybe through archaeological finds across Australia

NMA team

Thank you for your suggestion Sabrina. We have recently published a Defining Moment on First Rock Art, which can be viewed on our timeline.

8th Jul 2019 11:00am

Cathy freeman winning Gold at Sydney Olympics.

NMA team

Hi Shelley, thank you for this great suggestion. This moment has already been suggested and is on our timeline.

3rd Jul 2019 10:59am

I believe we should have Sam the Koala as a moment in Australia as it tells the tale of the koala who drank from a water bottle and was taken to Southern Ash Wildlife Shelter in the 2009 Bushfires

NMA team

Hi Sam, we have already written a feature moment on the 2009 Bushfires. However we think this is a great idea and are working on adding a photo of Sam the Koala to the 2009 bushfire moment.

28th Jun 2019 15:41undefined

Proposal for a new Australian Defining Moment:

Can a small group change a nation (and the world) through a clear, passionate, well-researched message?

Small Melbourne based protest group wins a nobel peace prize for calling to attention weapons against humanity https://www.armscontrol.org/act/2017-11/news/ican-wins-nobel-peace-prize

Despite being a small group, stripped of funding, and essentially challenging the Australian government and world’s super powers in their love of weapons which do not differentiate between soldiers or civilians, ICAN’s message prevailed!

Why does the world need cluster bombs? Or nuclear weapons?
http://www.icanw.org/au/ican-australia-people/

This Defining Moment would have direct links to the current NMA Defining Moment https://www.nma.gov.au/defining-moments/resources/maralinga

Come-on NMA! The public and primary and secondary educators across the country need and want to recognise the power of active citizenship, pressure groups, and have quality resources for Civics and Citizenship units in the Australian Curriculum.

Also, some of us have seen and heard the inspiring Former Federal MP and UN lawyer Melissa Parke speak at History Teachers' Conferences and about a small Melbourne group challenging and changing the world and 'Australia’s role leading the world to get rid of nuclear weapons and weapons that harm civilians is critically important’ (hear! hear!).

NMA team

Hi Mat, thanks for your suggestion. This moment has been suggested previously and can be viewed on our timeline.

20th Jun 2019 10:48undefined

Nicky Winmar mid 90s lifting his jumper and pointing to his skin mid AFL game - indigenous Australian

NMA team

Thanks for your suggestion Andrew. Nicky Winmar’s stand is already a moment and on our timeline.

8th Jun 2019 11:08undefined

The burning of gold licences and the anti Chinese party is not included in the defining moments wall

NMA team

Thanks for the suggestion, Abigail. The riots at Lambing flat are a defining moment on our timeline. We also have a few lines covering this in the Gold Rushes feature moment.

27th May 2019 14:39undefined

hello, this helped my son, benny and my daughter, mia
she finally understood the ending of the phar lap mystery book.
from archie ( not the one from riverdale) thanks

27th May 2019 14:38undefined

thank you! it worked wonderfuly for my kid, liah.

8th Oct 2018 11:10am

Percy Trezise and Dick Roughsey's friendship and bond resulting in them winning the Order of Australia and the Order of the British Empire as they created and left a legacy of more than 30 childrens books about indigenous history and culture published in every state and territory in Australia, and worldwide.

Dick Roughsey was awarded the Order of the British Empire, as an Officer of the Order of the British Empire, for Service to Aboriginal Art and Culture in 1978.
Percy Trezise AM (1923 - 2005) was a painter and writer as well as an historian and documenter of Aboriginal rock art. Trezise served in the RAAF during WW2, and from 1956 he worked in northern Australia as an airline pilot. From the air he would gauge areas likely to contain Aboriginal rock art that he would later explore. Trezise collaborated on a series of children’s books with Aboriginal artist Dick Roughsey, and as well as being a member of the Order of Australia, in 2004 he received an Honorary Doctorate from James Cook University.

Roughsey's passion for the preservation of Indigenous culture and traditions presented him with the opportunity to be appointed to the Aboriginal Advisory Committee for the Australia Council in 1970. In 1971 he wrote the first autobiography by an Aboriginal author. In 1973 Roughsey became the Chair of the Aboriginal Arts Board, continuing this role until 1975. He was also a member of the Institute of Aboriginal studies.

Children's Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Award, Picture Book of the Year, 1974: commended for The Giant Devil-Dingo
Fellowship of Australian Writers Patricia Weickhardt Award to an Aboriginal Writer, 1976 for The Rainbow Serpent
Fellowship of Australian Writers Patricia Weickhardt Award to an Aboriginal Writer, 1976.
Children's Book Council Book of the Year Award, Picture Book of the Year, 1976: winner for The Rainbow Serpent
Children's Book Council Book of the Year Award, Picture Book of the Year, 1979: winner for The Quinkins
IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) Honour Diploma, Illustration, 1980 for The Quinkins
Children's Book Council Book of the Year Award, Picture Book of the Year, 1983: commended for Turramulli the Giant Quinkin
The Order of the British Empire, Officer of the Order of the British Empire, for Service to Aboriginal Art and Culture, 1978
These notable awards for his publications were significant in contributing to cross-cultural communication between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

His cultural contributions inspired the establishment of the Gooalathaldin Memorial Community Centre, which opened in his honour on Mornington Island in 2003.

Roughsey met Percy Trezise in 1962 at Karumba Lodge at the mouth of the Norman River. Trezise was a pilot for Ansett Airlines who painted casually and quickly became Roughsey's mentor. Trezise encouraged Roughsey to paint the stories that were part of his country and not to mimic the styles and narratives of the then famous Albert Namatjira. Trezise encouraged Roughsey to develop his personal painting style on bark paintings initially, then move to oil on canvas. Throughout their relationship Trezise regularly supplied Roughsey with art materials often cutting bark himself from around his home in Cairns. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-31/quinkan-rock-art-percy-trezise/5255960 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Roughsey

8th Oct 2018 11:10am

ICAN awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2017. The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) originated in Australia launching in 2007 in Melbourne as a grassroots movement growing to 122 countries. It is the first Australian-born group to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Former Federal MP and UN lawyer Melissa Parke spoke at the 2018 History Teachers' Association about how, especially with current tensions so high in the region between Asia and the US, and Australia complicit in selling uranium to overseas buying knowing that nuclear and indiscriminate weapons are made and possibly stored on bases in and around our country, public awareness and global understandings not just about the threats from nuclear weapons, but also from prohibited weapons which are classed as indiscriminate and inhumane such as biological and chemical weapons, land mines, cluster munitions is important to be known and talked about. These concerns are based on the principles of international humanitarian law. http://www.icanw.org/au/ican-australia-people/ http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-06/anti-nuclear-campaign-wins-nobel-peace-prize/9024908

27th Sep 2018 1:33pm

This timeline is amazing
Thank you so much to the researchers :)

Could I suggest 'Statement of the heart' 2010's

21st Sep 2018 4:10pm

2017- ICAN wins Nobel Peace Prize

12th Aug 2018 12:06pm

Lucy Osburn
Lucy Osburn: The founder of modern Australian nursing

In the wake of a damning report into the Sydney Infirmary and Dispensary (known as Sydney Hospital from 1881), NSW Colonial Secretary Henry Parkes made a request to British nursing legend Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) to help reform the lax system of patient care. Nightingale appointed Lucy Osburn (1836–91) to head a team of six nurses to travel to Sydney to reform nursing at the infirmary and to establish a school to train local women, who would then spread the system of “Nightingale nursing” throughout hospitals in the colony.

10th Aug 2018 12:21pm

Lucy Osburn: The founder of modern Australian nursing
Lucy Osburn was an English nurse trained at the School of Nursing founded by Florence Nightingale. She is regarded as the founder of modern nursing in Australia.

In the wake of a damning report into the Sydney Infirmary and Dispensary (known as Sydney Hospital from 1881), NSW Colonial Secretary Henry Parkes made a request to British nursing legend Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) to help reform the lax system of patient care. Nightingale appointed Lucy Osburn (1836–91) to head a team of six nurses to travel to Sydney to reform nursing at the infirmary and to establish a school to train local women, who would then spread the system of “Nightingale nursing” throughout hospitals in the colony.

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