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A poster featuring a woman wearing a striped dress and holding a Kodak camera.  Text at the top reads 'Take a Kodak with you'. Text at the bottom reads 'The Kodak Girl'.
The Kodak Girl advertising poster

Photography in 1913 was widely used in art, advertising, science, medicine, anthropology, forensics and journalism, and was becoming a normal part of daily life

As point-and-shoot cameras developed, so did the popularity of photography. Kodak’s promise, ‘You press the button, we do the rest’, meant that photography was no longer restricted to those prepared to learn the intricacies of developing negatives. Family history and everyday life were preserved in snapshots and assembled in albums.

Journals and magazines promoted the work of leading art photographers, advertised the latest technology and provided ‘how-to’ guides on achieving better photographs. Competitions and camera clubs proliferated, fostering relationships between photographers locally and internationally.

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