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Portrait photo of an Aboriginal Australian man.
Mick Namararri Tjapaltjarri. Flinders University Art Museum Collection. Photo: Professor JVS Megaw

Pintupi people

about 1927–98

Mick Namararri and his sister were brought up by relatives after their parents were killed by a revenge party. Later they moved to a Christian mission, where the artist attended school before working as a stockman. In 1971 he was one of several Papunya; councillors who became founding members of Papunya Tula Artists. In the 1990s he was recognised as one of the painting movement’s elder statesmen and in 1994 was awarded the prestigious Red Ochre Award for his contribution to Aboriginal arts.

Mick Namararri Tjapaltjarri

Artworks

Aboriginal painting.
Flying Dingoes

Flying Dingoes, 1974

This painting depicts a land-forming event during the travels of ancestral Dingo Men in the Dreaming. The design has been superimposed on a ‘map’ of the escarpment where the dingo became a landform. The central series of motifs reveal the dingo’s body, with tracks on either side representing its paw marks. The dingo’s long ears, depicted as elongated arcs on either side of the concentric circles, enabled it to fly.

Mick Namararri Tjapaltjarri Flying Dingoes

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