You are in site section: History & ideas

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories

WARNING: Visitors should be aware that this website includes images and names of deceased people that may cause sadness or distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.


Welcome to the National Museum of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program.

Curator Jay Arthur in Kempsey with a group of Kinchela boys at the donation of the Kinchela gate to the National Museum (from left) Michael Walsh, Cecil Bowden, William Lesley, Ian (Crowe) Lawson and Manuel Ebsworth.

Photo: Barbara Paulson.


More images

Curator Jay Arthur in Kempsey with a group of Kinchela boys at the donation of the Kinchela gate to the National Museum (from left) Michael Walsh, Cecil Bowden, William Lesley, Ian (Crowe) Lawson and Manuel Ebsworth.

From the Museum

Explore our exhibitions and online features on the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, enduring Indigenous attachment to country and contributions to Australian society.

Exhibitions and galleries

Past exhibitions

See more...

Objects

Collection highlights

See more...

Collection interactives

 

Goree

Goree looks at the activities and achievements of the National Museum of Australia as we engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their material culture, and share their stories.

Latest from Goree

STORIES

3 Feb 2017

Memento of Wave Hill Walk-Off

A large metal trunk with a hinged lid. There are two clips at the front and a loop to attach a padlock. The trunk is rusty, has handle on either side and contains cooking utensils.
Brenda L Croft reflects on the significance of a tuckerbox owned by Aboriginal rights campaigner Brian Manning.

Read more...

Did you know?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program’s web banners and the title of our online newsletter, Goree, were inspired by the bogong moth.

Goree means 'bogong moth' and historically, the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples gathered at the site where the Museum stands in Canberra for an annual bogong moth ceremony.


‘Let me tell ya what happen …’

Uncle Tarzan Anderson, Mandandanji elder, 2005