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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories

WARNING: Visitors should be aware that this website includes images and names of deceased people that may cause sadness or distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.


Welcome to the National Museum of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program.

Curator Jay Arthur in Kempsey with a group of Kinchela boys at the donation of the Kinchela gate to the National Museum (from left) Michael Walsh, Cecil Bowden, William Lesley, Ian (Crowe) Lawson and Manuel Ebsworth.

Photo: Barbara Paulson.


More images

Curator Jay Arthur in Kempsey with a group of Kinchela boys at the donation of the Kinchela gate to the National Museum (from left) Michael Walsh, Cecil Bowden, William Lesley, Ian (Crowe) Lawson and Manuel Ebsworth.

From the Museum

Explore our exhibitions and online features on the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, enduring Indigenous attachment to country and contributions to Australian society.

Exhibitions and galleries

Past exhibitions

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Objects

Collection highlights

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Collection interactives

 

Latest from Goree

STAFF NEWS

27 Jun 2014

Farewell to staff

Two smiling women standing in front of a bookcase full of books and files.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program is farewelling valued staff members, intern Alana Garwood-Houng and specialist researcher Lily Withycombe. Both have been working with the Encounters project team.

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Did you know?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program’s web banners and online newsletter, Goree, were inspired by the bogong moth.

Goree means 'bogong moth' and historically, the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples gathered at the site where the Museum stands in Canberra for an annual bogong moth ceremony.


Quotes

'This is not just for the old culture. This is for the goin' forward … It's not going back to the 'Stone Age', it's flowing our soul back to the Beginning, the Dreaming, being one with the Presence of the undying spirit.'

Kevin Gilbert, 1988