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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories

WARNING: Visitors should be aware that this website includes images and names of deceased people that may cause sadness or distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.


Welcome to the National Museum of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program.

Curator Jono Lineen with the Torres Strait Islands component of the On Country photographic exhibition, showcasing contemporary Indigenous land and sea management practices across Australia.

Photo: Judith Hickson.


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ATSIP Curator, Jono Lineen, examines the Torres Strait Islands component of the On Country photographic exhibition showcasing contemporary Indigenous land and sea management practices across Australia.

From the Museum

Explore our exhibitions and online features on the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, enduring Indigenous attachment to country and contributions to Australian society.

Exhibitions and galleries

Past exhibitions

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Objects

Collection interactives

 

Goree

Goree looks at the activities and achievements of the National Museum of Australia as we engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their material culture, and share their stories.

Latest from Goree

COMMUNITY
VISITS

20 Oct 2017

Harvesting yams in Yolηu country photo essay

Yam harvest
The upcoming Midawarr | Harvest exhibition explores the plants of Yolngu country in north-east Arnhem Land based on works by artists Mulkun Wirrpanda and John Wolseley.

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Did you know?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program’s web banners and the title of our online newsletter, Goree, were inspired by the bogong moth.

Goree means 'bogong moth' and historically, the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples gathered at the site where the Museum stands in Canberra for an annual bogong moth ceremony.


Passing Down the Knowledge

‘Your father and kurdungurlu [ritual manager] give you a clue, they’ll show you a drawing on the ground first. You know it because you’ve seen your father [in a ceremony] with that painting on his body. You’ll see it, then you’ll know it.’

Michael Nelson Tjakamarra, 1988