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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories

WARNING: Visitors should be aware that this website includes images and names of deceased people that may cause sadness or distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.


Welcome to the National Museum of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program.

Curator and repatriation officer Lee Burgess talking about the wooden shields in the Museum's Open collections area.

Photo: Jason McCarthy.


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Curator and repatriation officer Lee Burgess talking about the wooden shields in the Museum's Open collections area.

From the Museum

Explore our exhibitions and online features on the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, enduring Indigenous attachment to country and contributions to Australian society.

Exhibitions and galleries

Past exhibitions

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Objects

Collection highlights

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Collection interactives

 

Goree

Goree looks at the activities and achievements of the National Museum of Australia as we engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their material culture, and share their stories.

Latest from Goree

STORIES

19 Jan 2015

Pukatja pottery in Porcelain City

Ceramic pot

Earlier this year the Museum purchased Kungkarangkalpa Attila, a stunning ceramic pot that Derek Jungarrayi Thompson made in Jingdezhen, China.

The pot is currently on display in the New Acquisition case outside Circa until early 2015.

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Did you know?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program’s web banners and the title of our online newsletter, Goree, were inspired by the bogong moth.

Goree means 'bogong moth' and historically, the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples gathered at the site where the Museum stands in Canberra for an annual bogong moth ceremony.


Quotes

Muralkarra (Crow)

Birrirra dordja
Garma bordja
Garanyula-nyula.
Warduba dirrbanga
Wandalanga
Gurta birriraia
Wak wak wak.

Crow rises to dance
Perched on Hollow-log Coffin
At his forest camp.
Crows of the Wardubalma clan
Dance like stars in the night sky
Calling 'Wak wak wak'.

From the Anbarra song-series Jambich
Transcribed and translated by Margaret Clunies Ross