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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories

WARNING: Visitors should be aware that this website includes images and names of deceased people that may cause sadness or distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.


Welcome to the National Museum of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program.

Jean Barr-Crombie, curator Barbara Paulson and Betty Bunyan at the Dingo Caves on Wankangurru Country north of Birdsville, Queensland.

Photo: Jeff Theys.


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Jean Barr-Crombie, curator Barbara Paulson and Betty Bunyan at the Dingo Caves on Wankangurru Country north of Birdsville, Queensland.

From the Museum

Explore our exhibitions and online features on the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, enduring Indigenous attachment to country and contributions to Australian society.

Exhibitions and galleries

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Goree

Goree looks at the activities and achievements of the National Museum of Australia as we engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their material culture, and share their stories.

Latest from Goree

STORIES

8 Aug 2016

Papunya women’s ground painting

 	People standing in a gallery looking at an artwork exhibiton.
A rare and beautiful example of a women’s ground painting from the Papunya art movement is the stunning centrepiece for the Streets of Papunya exhibition at the Drill Hall Gallery in Canberra until 14 August 2016.

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Did you know?

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program’s web banners and the title of our online newsletter, Goree, were inspired by the bogong moth.

Goree means 'bogong moth' and historically, the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples gathered at the site where the Museum stands in Canberra for an annual bogong moth ceremony.


‘This is not just for the old culture. This is for the goin’ forward … It’s not going back to the ‘Stone Age’, it’s flowing our soul back to the Beginning, the Dreaming, being one with the Presence of the undying spirit.’

Kevin Gilbert, 1988