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Ladies' grooming set

Ladies' grooming set

Many household uses for horsehair

Horses’ hair was one of the most readily available and versatile materials of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Lightweight and durable, the fibre could be combed, woven, teased or shredded. It was used, depending on its quality and length, for a variety of household or manufacturing purposes, including padding furniture, insulating walls, adding bulk to clothing, to make horse collars and saddles and as medical ligatures.

Velvet lined dressing case holding two hair brushes, two clothes brushes, a comb and a mirror, 1928.
Velvet lined dressing case holding two hair brushes, two clothes brushes, a comb and a mirror, presented by pioneering aviators Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm to their private secretary, Ellen Rogers, in 1928. Donated by Ellen Rogers. National Museum of Australia. Photo: Jason McCarthy.

A gift from Kingsford Smith and Ulm

Horsehair was widely used in brushes for male and female grooming. Soft but hardwearing body hair was often combined with thicker mane and tail hair, and sometimes mixed with the bristles or hair of other animals. This dressing case with horsehair brushes was presented by pioneering aviators Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm to their secretary, Ellen Rogers, in 1928.

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Ellen Rogers collection highlight 


People and the Environment

Horses in Australia is part of the National Museum's People and the Environment program. Discover more stories about people's relationships with Australia's natural and built environments on our People and the Environment website.