You are in site section: Online features

Lake Eildon

Lake Eildon

Lake Eildon was formed by a man-made dam, originally built from 1915-1927. Since then it has been enlarged twice and now has a capacity of 3392 million cubic metres. It has a catchment of 3885 square kilometres, a shoreline of 515 kilometres and a maximum depth of 76 metres. Lake Eildon is not just used to store water, it is also popular for fishing, boating and water-skiing. Levels vary according to how much rain there has been both above and below the dam. More rain means more flow into the lake and, because farmers don't need water for irrigation, less flow out. Dry times mean less flow into the lake and a greater demand from farmers.

Lake Eildon doesn't store just water - it also stores energy. Turn on the tap and the giant turbines of Eildon power station can generate up to 120 megawatts of electricity. The released water does not have to go straight down the river but can be stored in the Eildon Pondage, then let out gradually for the irrigators downstream.

To see how full Lake Eildon is at the moment, view the water storage report on the Goulburn-Murray Water website. Below you can view a slideshow of the Eildon power station and dam. Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images.