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Point Sturt and Districts Landcare Group Inc: Finniss River Lagoon

Point Sturt and Districts Landcare Group Inc: Finniss River Lagoon

Bottle number: 117

About the water

Greg Lundstrom from the Signal Point Environmental Group taking water and soil samples from the lagoon.
Greg Lundstrom, Signal Point Environmental Group.
Photo: Bruce Allnutt.

Collected at: In a lagoon connected to the Finniss River, between Finniss and Clayton, South Australia

E: 304305, N: 6078030, Zone 54

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Collected by: Point Sturt and Districts Landcare Group Inc.

Group Secretary's property adjoins the Lagoon.

 

Water quality:

Turbidity: NTU 60
pH: 7
Nitrates: less than 0.05mg/L
Salinity: 2490┬ÁS/cm
Phosphates: less than 0.25mg/L
Dissolved oxygen: 7.1mg/L

As the wetlands were the habitat of fresh water turtles, 20 turtles were re-introduced to the Lagoon on 26 November 2009 by school children from Milang and Goolwa with a government person as an adviser.

These school children have been saving the turtles for nearly 3 years. With the water level in the area dropping and the water greatly increasing in salinity, the turtles attracted a marine worm which created a 'coral' like crust all over the turtle shell, so much so that it restricted the movement of legs and neck of the turtles to the extent where they became easy prey for foxes and other predatory animals. The children rescued these turtles, scrapped off the marine worms, cleaned them in fresh water and either kept them in a secure place or took them further up river.

A lagoon connected to the Finniss River, between Finniss and Clayton, South Australia.
A lagoon connected to the Finniss River, between Finniss and Clayton, South Australia. Photo: Bruce Allnutt.

About the site

A lagoon, part of the Lower Finniss River wetlands. The Lagoon is joined to the main River channel by a narrow entrance on the Western end of the Lagoon.

What's going on:

The Lagoon has been dry for the last 3 years. It has refilled in the past 3 months due to the construction of the weir at Clayton Bay.

Monitoring of water quantity and quality. In the last couple of years a number of tests have been made, by government (and others) officers to assess the possibilities of acid sulphate soils.

After the Lagoon died out, a considerable number of plants appeared for which a survey was carried out to catalogue the plants and a photographic record was made.

Some bioremediation was attempted with native species however these have now been covered with water.