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League of Legends - download the audio

15 APRIL 2008

About the audio

The National Museum of Australia is making the stories from League of Legends - an exhibition celebrating 100 years of rugby league in Australia - available for free mp3 download and broadcast.

To download the audio click on the link at the bottom of the screen and select the option to Save. You can then save the audio into a desired location.

About the League of Legends exhibition

The history of rugby league is told though objects from the exhibition, including: Frank Hyde's card table; the ball from 'the best game ever' - the 1989 Balmain-Canberra grand final; and the 'little master' Clive Churchill's shoulder pads, which help tell the great fullback's story of courage.

The exhibition shows that the story of rugby league is also a story of broadcasting in Australia, especially in the bush. The National Museum has designed this free content for radio stations broadcasting to audiences in rural and regional parts of Australia who love their rugby league.

League of Legends: 100 years of Rugby League in Australia is on display at the National Museum of Australia until Sunday, May 11. The exhibition will then travel to the Queensland Museum, Brisbane; the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney; the Museum of Tropical Queensland, Townsville; and the National Museum of Sport, Melbourne. (See the League of Legends Travelling details page for exact dates)

The exhibition was developed with the Centenary of Rugby League Committee.

Contact

For interviews, images, lists of objects and fact sheets, please contact Caroline Vero on 02 6208 5338, 0438 620 710 or media@nma.gov.au or Dennis Grant on 02 6208 5351, 0409 916 481.

Intro: Hello, I'm Guy Hansen, curator of the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition. In a moment, the story of rugby league's best ever grand final.

Guy Hansen: For many, the 1989 clash between Balmain in Canberra rates as one of the most exciting grand finals of the modern era. While Balmain led for most of the match, a late try by Canberra winger John 'Chicka' Ferguson forced the match into extra time. Tigers fans watched in horror as the Raiders scored a try and a field goal, becoming the first non Sydney-based side to win a New South Wales rugby league grand final. You can see the match football from the 1989 grand final, on loan from the Balmain Leagues Club, in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently touring Australia.

Tail: This has been the story of rugby league's best ever grand final. I'm Guy Hansen, curator of the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition.

> Best Ever Game (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 772kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: During the early 1950s, Australia and Britain were involved in some epic struggles. Australian fans took great pleasure in witnessing the end of Britain's domination of test clashes during the Lions' 1950 tour. In one of the most famous encounters in rugby league test history, Australia defeated Great Britain in the third test at the Sydney Cricket Ground in 1950. Played in appalling conditions, the Kangaroos defeated the Lions 5-2. You can see the Ashes Cup, which was presented to the victorious Australians, in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently on tour around Australia. (Tail)

> Defeat of the Lions (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 812kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: Frank Hyde's gravelly voice is synonymous with rugby league. Starting in 1953 with radio station 2SM, he was unbeaten in the listener ratings for 31 years. His trademark call from his card table on the sidelines, 'It's long enough, it's high enough, it's straight between the posts!', could be heard on radios everywhere. You can see Frank Hyde's famous card table in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently on tour around Australia. (Tail)

> Frank Hyde's card table (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 685kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: The year 1951 saw a visit by arguably the best French side ever to tour Australia. Playing stylish and attacking football, the French defeated Australia 2-1 in a closely-fought series that attracted huge crowds. France's star player Puig-Aubert, nicknamed 'Pipette' for his ever-present cigarette, was famed for his kicking abilities. In the deciding test at the Sydney Cricket Ground, Aubert landed seven goals in France's 35-14 win over Australia. You can see Puig Aubert's jersey from the 1951 test in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently touring Australia. (Tail)

> The Formidable Frenchman (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 844kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: On 8 August 1907 a group of leading rugby union players and supporters met at Bateman's Hotel, George Street, Sydney, to discuss the creation of the New South Wales Rugby Football League. A key aspect of the new code was that players would be paid for playing the game. Adopting the playing rules of the Northern Union of England, the new competition began in earnest on Easter Monday 1908. The first clubs to take the field were Glebe, Newtown, Western Suburbs, South Sydney, North Sydney, Balmain, Eastern Suburbs, Newcastle and Cumberland. You can see the RAS Challenge Shield, the first premiership trophy of Australian rugby league, in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently touring Australia. (Tail)

> The Foundation Clubs (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 919kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: An inspirational fullback, Clive Churchill was widely acknowledged amongst his contemporaries to be one of the most accomplished players of the post-Second World War era. His nickname, 'the little master', placed him alongside rugby league's first superstar, Dally Messenger. Weighing in at just over 76 kilograms, Churchill was small compared with many of his opponents. His courage was legendary however, as exemplified in a match against Manly-Warringah at the close of the 1955 season when, having broken his wrist early in the first half, he completed the game. You can see Clive Churchill's shoulder pads in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently touring Australia. (Tail)

> The Little Master (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 852kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: Known as the 'old tin pot', the Maher Cup was the focus of passionate rivalry between teams in southern New South Wales. Neighbouring towns would challenge whoever happened to hold the cup at the time. Originally a rugby union cup, the first rugby league challenge match was played in Tumut in 1921. The cup changed hands hundreds of times until Tumut regained possession for the final time in 1971. You can see the Maher Cup in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently on tour around Australia. (Tail)

> The Old Tin Pot (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 718kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: The Winfield Cup was the premiership trophy for the New South Wales Rugby League from 1982 until 1994 and the Australian Rugby League in 1995. The trophy was inspired by John O'Gready's classic photograph of Arthur Summons and Norm Provan immediately after the 1963 grand final between Western Suburbs and St George. The post-match embrace of the two rugby league warriors also appears on the Optus Cup and the Telstra Premiership Trophy. You can see the Winfield Cup in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently on tour around Australia. (Tail)

> The Winfield Cup (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 809kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: Known as 'the Bradman of league' and 'the wonderman', Dave Brown was league's leading player in the 1930s. His success at Eastern Suburbs led to selection for New South Wales and later Australia. His reputation was such that English club Warrington paid Brown a 1000 pound sign-on fee to play in England. You can see Dave Brown's sky-blue New South Wales jersey in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently touring Australia. (Tail)

> The Wonderman (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 617kb)

(Intro)
Guy Hansen: When war broke out in Europe in 1914 rugby league faced a major challenge. The question was to play or not to play. Many footballers answered the country's call by enlisting for service overseas. Rugby union suspended competition for the duration of the conflict, but league forged on, providing much-needed entertainment during the war years. Balmain dominated the competition during the war, winning premierships in 1915, 1916 and 1917. The team's playing list included such greats as Charles 'Chook' Fraser, Arthur 'Pony' Halloway and Reg 'Whip' Ladder. You can see the Hugh D McIntosh shield, which Balmain won for its hat-trick of premierships, in the National Museum of Australia's League of Legends exhibition currently touring Australia. (Tail)

> World War One (zip file containing three mp3 audio files, 965kb)