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We are moving to a new booking system and are not taking new bookings until 14 January 2019.

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Explore changing attitudes to migration

Year levels

5–12 (6–12 in Qld, WA and SA)

Group size

40 students (note that two groups can run concurrently)

Duration

2 hours (90 minutes with Museum educator and 30 minutes teacher-guided exploration)

Cost

$7 per student

Availability

Tuesday–Friday at 10am and 1pm

Alternative times may be available for local schools. Please contact bookings@nma.gov.au for further information.

Curriculum links

Australian History curriculum links to our programs (225kb PDF)

Where did your Mum and Dad grow up? Were they born in Australia or overseas?

In Australia’s Migration Stories students investigate some of the 10 million migration stories from 1788 to today, and reflect on Australia’s changing attitudes towards migration.

In this program students use an iPad and activity card to record when, how and why individuals came to Australia.

Aims

  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore stories of individuals and groups who have migrated to Australia since 1788.
  • Enable students to reflect on why over 10 million individuals have migrated to Australia since 1788.
  • Challenge students to investigate changing attitudes to migrants.

Structure

  • Introductory activity — through an investigation of mystery migrants’ belongings, students explore stories of migration and reflect on how Australian government policies and community attitudes towards migrants have changed over time.
  • Gallery activity — working in groups, students explore migration stories in the Australian Journeys gallery and record, using digital cameras and activity cards, when, how and why individuals came to Australia.
  • Reflection — students gather to discuss the stories they selected and the range of contributions migrants have made to Australia, as well as how their photographs may be used for further research and reflection on Australia’s migration history back at school.
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