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1913 handy hints

1913 handy hints

by Noellen Newton

This week we would like to share some handy hints from yesteryear. There were some novel ways of using tea-leaves …

To sweep carpets

 Screenshot from book
Damp newspapers torn into small pieces is much more effective for sweeping a carpet than tea leaves.

Source: Home Cookery for Australia: All Tested Recipes, 1913, Arbuckle, Waddell & Fawckner, Melbourne, p179.

To clean varnished paint

 Screenshot from book
If soap or soda be used the varnish will come off. Take the tea leaves which are left in the teapot, pour some hot water on them, and let them stand for some ten minutes. Then pour the tea into a basin, wash the paint with a clean flannel, and dry with a clean cloth.

Source: Home Cookery for Australia: All Tested Recipes, 1913, Arbuckle, Waddell & Fawckner, Melbourne, p183.

To remove tea stains

Here is a way to remove the tea stains that may be on your clothes after you have swept the carpet and cleaned the paint!

Screenshot from book
When tea is spilt on a white cloth, at once remove it from the table, hold it over a basin, and pour clean boiling water through the stains. Coffee stains should be treated in the same way.

Source: Home Cookery for Australia: All Tested Recipes, 1913, Arbuckle, Waddell & Fawckner, Melbourne, p180.

To remove the smell of paint

Then to remove the smell of the paint make sure you have plenty of hay!

Screenshot from book
To get rid of the smell of oil paint, place a handful of hay in a pailful of water, and let it stand in the room newly painted.

Source: Home Cookery for Australia: All Tested Recipes, 1913, Arbuckle, Waddell & Fawckner, Melbourne, p182.

Who knew that tea-leaves could be so versatile?



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Glorious Days: Australia 1913 will be on show at the National Museum of Australia from 7 March to 13 October 2013. Costs apply.