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True Blue Aussie Quiz

 

True Blue Aussie Quiz

... how true blue are you?

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Question 1. What does the saying 'ducks on the pond' mean?

A) Very calm weather
B) To get cold feet
C) Look out – a female is approaching
D) Hard work going unrecognised

Question 2. Why was a Bondi tram said to 'shoot through'?

A) The Bondi express route ran downhill so it seemed to be a faster service
B) Conductors used to carry firearms to protect themselves from tram-jackings in the late 1950s
C) The Bondi express tram ran straight through from Darlinghurst to Bondi
D) This was a joke—the trams were always slow and late

Question 3. Why is a Mallee bull considered fit?

A) They are not – it is sarcasm
B) They survive in very difficult conditions
C) Mallee country is lush and the stock are well fed and healthy
D) It comes from the word 'malleable'

Question 4. Where did the word dinkum originate?

A) British Midlands term dinkum, meaning a 'a fair share of work'
B) Chinese word ding kam, meaning 'top gold'
C) American slang, dang kids, an expression of surprise
D) The sound a nugget of gold makes when it hits the edge of the pan

Question 5. The term 'furphy', any untrue rumour or absurd story, came from what?

A) It sounded similar to 'furry' or 'fuzzy', descriptive of the facts within a rumour
B) The carts used to transport water during World War 1
C) A container used to send messages via pigeon
D) A river in Egypt whose water is quite stagnant and muddy

Question 6. Where did the word 'billy' originate?

A) Originally a bucket or container used to carry water around goat farms
B) Named after a notable convict turned tea blender in the early day of the colony
C) Tea that was imported from India came in a cylindrical tin called a billi
D) Scottish dialect word meaning 'cooking utensil'

Question 7. The origins of the term 'plonk' stem from?

A) Pirate culture where men were given one last drink before walking the plank
B) The First World War mispronunciation of the French term – 'vin blanc'
C) German settlers' term for someone who would drink himself or herself unconscious ' Ker-plonk'.
D) Nineteenth Century English terminology for someone who would drink excessively, a 'plonker'

Question 8. The origins of the term 'To big note yourself' derive from:

A) The physical size of the big-noter's money
B) The volume at which a big-noter speaks in order for everyone to hear how well they are doing
C) The fact that wealthy people were well fed and often became quite big
D) The Italian term 'bigge-noté' meaning a high level of confidence

Question 9. Where does the term 'trackie daks' come from?

A) The baggy trousers commonly worn by Aboriginal trackers
B) Combination of track pants, shortened to trackie, and Daks, a trade name for men's pants
C) General term for pants
D) Term used for the woollen lining in men's trousers

Question 10. Which of the following are not specifically associated with Australian senses of the word 'squatter'?

A) Unlawful occupation of an unoccupied building
B) Aristocratic land ownership
C) Wealth and power
D) Grazing livestock on a large scale of Crown land without legal title

Question 11. Why are bandicoots thought to be miserable creatures?

A) The male only mates once in their lifetime, after which they are eaten by the opposite sex
B) Their long face suggests unhappiness
C) In a dreamtime story the bandicoot had its nose stretched by a dingo
D) Because at night the call of the bandicoot sounds like a baby crying

ANSWERS

Answer: Question 1

C) Look out – a female is approaching

Answer: Question 2

C) The Bondi express tram ran straight through from Darlinghurst to Bondi

Answer: Question 3

B) They survive in very difficult conditions

Answer: Question 4

A) British Midlands term dinkum, meaning a 'a fair share of work'

Answer: Question 5

B) The carts used to transport water during World War 1

Answer: Question 6

D) Scottish dialect word meaning 'cooking utensil'

Answer: Question 7

B) The First World War mispronunciation of the French term – 'vin blanc'

Answer: Question 8

A) The physical size of the big-noter's money

Answer: Question 9

B) Combination of track pants, shortened to trackie, and Daks, a trade name for men's pants

Answer: Question 10

B) Aristocratic land ownership

Answer: Question 11

B) Their long face suggests unhappiness