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These are modern dreamtime stories!

Stephen Hagan, Gordon Syron and Sam Wagan Watson

Who You Callin’ Urban? forum, 6 July 2007

The ways the ‘active’ Indigenous voice has changed the representation of Indigenous cultures from urban areas in museums and keeping places is explored by Indigenous artist Gordon Syron, poet Sam Wagan Watson and writer Stephen Hagan.

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art, indigenous, museums, urban

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Writing onto public record our stories

Michael Aird, Stephen Hagan, Christine Hansen and Professor Peter Read

Who You Callin’ Urban? forum, 6 July 2007

An exploration of the term ‘urban’, whether it is an appropriate reference for Indigenous people living in Australian cities, and the many ways Indigenous culture is expressed in these environments.

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indigenous, urban

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Who you callin’ urban?

Vernon Ah Kee, Bronwyn Bancroft, Richard Bell, Wesley Enoch and Dr Anita Heiss

Who You Callin’ Urban? forum, 6 July 2007

An examination of the expression of Indigenous culture and identity by a dynamic group of contemporary artists and authors. Explores the impact the ‘art’ movement has had on Indigenous people and how cultural material can be ‘read’ as documentary text.

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art, indigenous, urban

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The natural world as a character

Nicholas Drayson, novelist and Dr Libby Robin, National Museum of Australia

Historical Imagination series, 24 June 2007

Environmental historian Libby Robin and novelist Nicholas Drayson share an interest in nature and the history of science and discovery. They explore the dynamic relationship between historical evidence, recollections and the reconstruction of the past.

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environment, science, ways of knowing

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Scientific analysis of the Leichhardt plate

David Hallam, National Museum of Australia

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Conservator David Hallam outlines the metal and corrosion analysis which helped to authenticate the Leichhardt nameplate. The plate is the only known artefact from Ludwig Leichhardt’s lost 1848 Australian expedition with a corroborated provenance.

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conservation, exploration, leichhardt

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Overview of the National Museum of Australia’s purchase of the Leichhardt nameplate

Matthew Higgins, National Museum of Australia

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Curator Matthew Higgins outlines the work undertaken to establish the authenticity of a small brass nameplate, the first object with a corroborated provenance from explorer Ludwig Leichhardt’s lost 1848 expedition.

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collection, exploration, leichhardt, science

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Deepening the mystery: the 1938 South Australian government Leichhardt search party

Dr Philip Jones, South Australian Museum

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Historian Philip Jones re-examines evidence found in the Simpson Desert in 1938, which prompted a search for the Ludwig Leichhardt’s lost expedition. He argues the search party may have discovered an Aboriginal burial site.

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archaeology, exploration, indigenous, leichhardt

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Leichhardt as scientist and diarist

Dr Tom Darragh, Museum Victoria

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Tom Darragh uses Ludwig Leichhardt’s diaries to show the skill and accuracy with which the explorer and naturalist recorded scientific observations and information about plants and geological specimens, in terminology which is still used today.

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environment, exploration, leichhardt, science

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He nearly made it: Leichhardt’s ‘grand plan’ of 1848

Dr Darrell Lewis, Australian National University

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Darrell Lewis examines German explorer Ludwig Leichhardt’s intended route for his attempted east-west crossing of Australia. Lewis argues that Leichhardt followed his plan and managed to cross two-thirds of the continent.

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exploration, leichhardt, science

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Leichhardt: the motivations of an explorer

Professor Rod Home, University of Melbourne

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Historian Rod Home looks at Ludwig Leichhardt’s family background, financial situation and formal scientific training to argue the explorer was also a perceptive naturalist with a well defined research agenda in Australia. NOTE: audio loops from 18:40 on.

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exploration, leichhardt, science

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