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Emily Kame Kngwarreye: her place in Australian art

Susan McCulloch

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

Art writer and critic Susan McCulloch discusses the significance of Emily Kame Kngwarreye in twentieth-century Australian art, her contribution to its development and the stylistic breakthroughs of her work.

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art, emily, indigenous

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‘Why do those fellas paint like me …?’ Emily Kame Kngwarreye symposium welcome and introduction

Dennis Grant, Dr Margo Neale and Agnes Shea

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

The National Museum’s Margo Neale and Dennis Grant welcome participants to the Emily Kame Kngwarreye symposium, for the exchange of cultural perspectives by Australian and Japanese speakers. Includes a welcome by Ngunnawal elder Agnes Shea.

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art, emily, indigenous

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Japanese responses to the Emily exhibition

Chiaki Ajoika, Hitomi Toku and Mayumi Uchida

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

Art historian Chiaki Ajoika, Aboriginal art consultant Mayumi Uchida and Australian Embassy official Hitomi Toku discuss Japanese responses to the Osaka and Tokyo exhibitions of Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s work, with Ronin Films managing director Andrew Pike.

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art, emily, indigenous

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Emily as located historian: the Camel Lady narrates a history of discovery without 1788

Professor Ann McGrath, Australian National University

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

Historian Ann McGrath discusses paintings as agents of history, bringing history into the present. She looks at the work of Emily Kame Kngwarreye to investigate how paintings tell different stories depending on where they are presented.

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art, emily, indigenous

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Emily Kngwarreye’s practice of painting: an international perspective

Professor Terry Smith, University of Pittsburgh, United States

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

Art historian Terry Smith explores how Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s work operates between the evolution of Indigenous and non-Indigenous art in Australia. He draws comparisons with the achievements of contemporary European artists.

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art, emily, indigenous

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The possible modernist: an ‘insider’ view

Dr Ian McLean, University of Western Australia

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

Art historian Ian McLean offers a view based on the Australian post-colonial experience, arguing that Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s form of modernism is different from international modernism in both source and history.

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art, emily, indigenous

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A new ritual in contemporary Aboriginal art

Dr Sally Butler, University of Queensland

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

The art of Emily Kame Kngwarreye and the use of cultural rituals to demonstrate Aboriginal modernity is explored by curator Sally Butler. She also compares Emily’s art practices to 1970s and 1980s modernist design techniques.

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art, emily, indigenous

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The impossible modernist: an ‘outsider’ view

Professor Akira Tatehata, National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan

Emily Kame Kngwarreye series, 22 August 2008

Museum director and Emily Kame Kngwarreye exhibition curator Akira Tatehata explores the ironies of ‘the impossible modernist’ from another cultural space, as a Japanese man steeped in his own culture and an international art curator and academic.

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art, emily, indigenous

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George Reid: a journey through three parliaments

Dr Martha Sear, National Museum of Australia

Behind the Scenes – Australian Journeys series, 13 August 2008

Curator Martha Sear discusses objects in the National Historical Collection that once belonged to Sir George Reid, a key figure in Australia’s Federation-era political history. Reid’s story features in the Australian Journeys gallery.

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biography, collection, exhibition, journeys, migration, politics

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Moving stories: women’s lives, British women and the postwar Australian dream

Professor Alistair Thomson, Monash University

Historical Interpretation series, 9 July 2008

Oral historian Alistair Thomson explores the experience of migration to Australia in the 1950s and 1960s, through the eyes and life stories of four British women, during his time as a Director’s Fellow at the National Museum of Australia.

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biography, journeys, migration, women

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