You are in site section: About us

Exhibitions (page 4 of 4)

Travelling exhibitions

The Museum's diverse travelling exhibitions program is a core component of the strategy to reach national audiences. During 2004-2005, the Museum presented and toured seven exhibitions to each mainland state and territory.

As a national institution, the Museum is responsible for engaging national audiences and delivering outcomes to all Australians.

Outreach policy, February 2005

As a national institution, the Museum is responsible for engaging national audiences and delivering outcomes to all Australians.

Outreach policy, February 2005

Behind the Lines: The Year's Best Cartoons 2003 and 2004

Herald Sun cartoonist Mark Knight goes Behind the Lines.
Herald Sun cartoonist Mark Knight goes Behind the Lines. Photo: George Serras.

This exhibition is developed and toured each year by the Museum to highlight that year's best political cartoons.

During the year, the Museum travelled The Year's Best Cartoons for 2003 and developed and opened the 2004 cartoon exhibition at the Museum.

This exhibition series usually travels to New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory.

Outlawed!: Discover the Stories behind the World's Rebels, Revolutionaries and Bushrangers

Developed by the Museum, this exhibition explored the enduring appeal of the rebel through the stories of 25 outlaws from nine countries. It contrasted 'facts' about outlaw characters with evolving popular mythologies. It opened at the Museum in late 2003, and travelled to Melbourne Museum from June to October 2004.

Hickory Dickory Dock: The Changing Face of Play School

The Museum developed this exhibition to explore the changing face of ABC Television's Play School, one of Australia's longest-running and best-loved children's television shows. The exhibition looks behind the scenes and celebrates the toys, presenters and educational features of Play School. The exhibition toured to Victoria, New South Wales, Western Australia and Queensland. It is scheduled to tour Tasmania in late 2005.

Rare Trades: Making Things by Hand in the Digital Age

This Museum-developed exhibition celebrates the art of skilled manual work and ancient trades and the enduring need for people to make things by hand. During the year, the exhibition toured to South Australia, Western Australia, Queensland and Victoria.

In Search of the Birdsville Track: An Artist in the Outback

The Birdsville Track comes to Canberra.
The Birdsville Track comes to Canberra. Photo: George Serras.

This temporary and touring exhibition opened at the Museum in June 2005 and will travel through New South Wales and Queensland during the next financial year. The exhibition showcases the work of English artist Noelle Sandwith who travelled the Birdsville Track in 1953. During her trip, Sandwith sketched, photographed and wrote about those she met and the scenes she encountered. The National Museum of Australia Press published a book on Sandwith's work to accompany the exhibition.

Pooaraar: The Great Forgetting

This selection of pen and wash drawings from the NHC explores Aboriginal and European interaction from 1770 through to the present day. The drawings were created by Indigenous artist Bevan Hayward (known as Pooaraar) who was commissioned to illustrate the poetry of Geoff Page for the book The Great Forgetting (published jointly by the Museum and Aboriginal Studies Press in 1996). The exhibition opened in the First Australians gallery in June 2005.

Our Community: A Great Place to Be

Community members help launch the photographic exhibition, Our Community.
Community members help launch the photographic exhibition, Our Community. Photo: George Serras.

Our Community: A Great Place To Be explores the distinctive cultural and social diversity of communities in the north-west of New South Wales: predominantly Walgett, Brewarrina, Lightning Ridge and Angledool. Through photographs and associated material, the exhibition looks at the concept of community as self-defining and explores local social histories. This exhibition in particular makes contemporary Aboriginal rural culture more visually accessible to broader Australia. It opened in the First Australians gallery in June 2005.

The images for the exhibition were taken by some of Australia's leading photographers - Juno Gemes, Sharon Aldrick and Ron Blake who worked closely with project leader Frances Peters-Little and Indigenous and multicultural communities.

Future temporary and travelling exhibitions

Development began on several temporary exhibitions to be staged over the next five years. They include:

  • 25 Years of Collecting (working title) - this exhibition will represent the strength and diversity of the Museum's collection
  • 100 years of surf life saving in Australia
  • the Miss Australia Quest
  • Title Deeds (working title) - featuring up to 30 large Papunya Tula canvasses by Indigenous artists
  • Migration Memories - an exhibition drawing on the outcomes of an Australian Research Council grant.